One Dollar Coin Riddle

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Joshua Ong Joshua Ong 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #22043
    Profile photo of Joshua Ong
    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    They’re both one dollar coins, but can you tell which countries they come from? No googling, please. (Hint: the animal icons are a big giveaway!) Besides flag-collecting, I also enjoy numismatics (coin collecting). These two one-dollar coins are part of a 179-coin collection. Any suggestions about the picture?

    Panasonic DMC-FZ30
    1/50 sec. f/3.6 7.4 mm
    ISO 80

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    #22097
    Profile photo of James Staddon
    James Staddon
    Moderator

    I didn’t know coin collecting was called numismatics!

    The one on the right has got to be New Zealand, right? And the one on the left…. I’d guess Australia?

    I think it’s interesting the lighting that you chose. I love the prominent shadows!

    On the opposite extreme, are you familiar with a creative secret for photographing coins under exceptionally soft, even lighting?

    #22099
    Profile photo of Joshua Ong
    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Yes, numismatics is coin collecting, as philately is stamp collecting. You’re absolutely right on guessing the one dollar coins. I actually took the picture with the early evening sun as my lighting.

    On the opposite extreme, are you familiar with a creative secret for photographing coins under exceptionally soft, even lighting?

    I’m not aware of this secret. How do you go about doing it?

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by Profile photo of Joshua Ong Joshua Ong.
    #22129
    Profile photo of James Staddon
    James Staddon
    Moderator

    If you can afford to buy a gallon of milk, you can afford this to try out this trick! (That is, if it’s a not a white plastic jug milk; perhaps you’ll have to use a jug of water; as long as it’s “clear”).

    Basically, you can just cut off the bottom of a plastic milk jug, set it over your coins, cut off the top of the milk jug enough to let your camera look down inside, shine a bright light on one side of the milk jug….and tada! You’ve got nice even lighting over your coins!

    #22212
    Profile photo of Joshua Ong
    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Wow! I hadn’t thought of using a milk jug for photographing coins. Do product photographers use similar items to create different settings for their products? Below is an example of a coin picture employing the creative trick.

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