One Dollar Coin Riddle

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of James Staddon James Staddon 3 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #22043
    Profile photo of Joshua Ong
    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    They’re both one dollar coins, but can you tell which countries they come from? No googling, please. (Hint: the animal icons are a big giveaway!) Besides flag-collecting, I also enjoy numismatics (coin collecting). These two one-dollar coins are part of a 179-coin collection. Any suggestions about the picture?

    Panasonic DMC-FZ30
    1/50 sec. f/3.6 7.4 mm
    ISO 80

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    #22097
    Profile photo of James Staddon
    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    I didn’t know coin collecting was called numismatics!

    The one on the right has got to be New Zealand, right? And the one on the left…. I’d guess Australia?

    I think it’s interesting the lighting that you chose. I love the prominent shadows!

    On the opposite extreme, are you familiar with a creative secret for photographing coins under exceptionally soft, even lighting?

    #22099
    Profile photo of Joshua Ong
    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Yes, numismatics is coin collecting, as philately is stamp collecting. You’re absolutely right on guessing the one dollar coins. I actually took the picture with the early evening sun as my lighting.

    On the opposite extreme, are you familiar with a creative secret for photographing coins under exceptionally soft, even lighting?

    I’m not aware of this secret. How do you go about doing it?

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of Joshua Ong Joshua Ong.
    #22129
    Profile photo of James Staddon
    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    If you can afford to buy a gallon of milk, you can afford this to try out this trick! (That is, if it’s a not a white plastic jug milk; perhaps you’ll have to use a jug of water; as long as it’s “clear”).

    Basically, you can just cut off the bottom of a plastic milk jug, set it over your coins, cut off the top of the milk jug enough to let your camera look down inside, shine a bright light on one side of the milk jug….and tada! You’ve got nice even lighting over your coins!

    #22212
    Profile photo of Joshua Ong
    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Wow! I hadn’t thought of using a milk jug for photographing coins. Do product photographers use similar items to create different settings for their products? Below is an example of a coin picture employing the creative trick.

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    #22493
    Profile photo of James Staddon
    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    Hmm. It didn’t turn out as expected. Perhaps it requires lights on both sides. Also, try moving the light source away from the jug a bit. The lighting isn’t as even as it should be. Also, try photographing the coins on a piece of glass. If the light is coming from above, it should refect the light, making the background more white.

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