With the frequent thunderstorms that have passed through West Virginia this summer, there have been a surprising amount of opportunities to take pictures of rainbows. Most of the time I only have my phone on me to take pictures with, but still, it’s better than nothing!

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And it sure is easier to shoot panoramas with a phone camera. Smile

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I won’t be able to use phone photos for much else other than online viewing, but that’s where the majority of pictures are used anyway these days. Here’s a shot from outside our church after evening services on Sunday.

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But sometimes, when I have the time to pull out the big guns, I am able to have more control over how I  interact with the scene and pull out perspectives that most phone camera won’t be able to provide, like zooming in to fill the frame with only elements that relate to the scene.

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And I thought this one with the bee hives was good enough to make into a desktop background! Lenspiration subscribers will have access to the download link in the next Latest from Lenspiration update which I plan to send out on Monday.

West Virginia Rainbow

West Virginia Rainbow
Countryside outside of Salem, West Virginia

Over the centuries, the wonderment and beauty of the rainbow has caused it to be pegged in association with many different things.

But to me, rainbows remind me of two amazing promises…

First, that God would never flood the earth completely with water again. I know this because God said it. He said, “I do set my bow in the cloud, and it shall be for a token of a covenant between me and the earth . . . and I will remember my covenant, which is between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh” (Genesis 9:13-15).

And second, that God would provide a way of escape when He comes again to judge the world by fire. I know this because God said it too: “And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, . . . I will show wonders in heaven above, and signs in the earth beneath; blood, and fire, and vapor and smoke: the sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before that great and notable day of the Lord come: and it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved” (Acts 2:17-21).

The ark was to Noah as Jesus is for us today! The ark was built as large as it was to hold many, many people, and Noah preached the way of salvation for many, many years to warn the world of the coming judgment. Why is it that no one but Noah’s family trusted in God’s plan for salvation?

In the same way, in our modern world, God is still unwilling that any should perish! He yearns to save all men from sin’s punishment of death in the final judgment at the end of the world. And he has provided an “ark” through Jesus Christ which He proclaims through His Word and through His people. Will we take heed?!

This amazing analogy between the ark and Jesus Christ is an analogy more beautifully explained an amplified in this heart-searching message by Voddie Bacham, a modern preacher of righteousness.

Listen to it. Take it to heart. Be changed by it!

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